Help with Cabinet Doors please

Home Forums DIY Tank Equipment Help with Cabinet Doors please

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #5909
    elfredanellyparker
    Participant

    Hi guys hope, you have all had a good day.

    It’s been a mixed one for me first wasps lost the semi final but the chelsea won the FA cup. Oh and the wife made me watch some wedding HAHAHA.

    So I’m thinking of finishing the aluminum frame I’m going to build in this https://www.diy.com/departments/bui…terials/furniture-boards/grey/_/N-8snZ1z13zra or something simaler.

    What I am struggling with is how to hang them as doors. There will be three of them and I would like them on a push. How do I fix the hinge to the door? I know this seems simple but I’m a plumber not a chippy hahaha.

    #5923
    barefooted_elfreda
    Participant

    You need a hinge bore drill bit, spacing is usually 4 mm from the outside edge of the door to the outside edge of the hole.

    #5924
    barefooted_elfreda
    Participant

    The one on the left is well within range my bta is like an elastic band.

    #5931
    parker_the_barker
    Participant

    Don’t worry after a search on google I answered my question. I was worried that I was going to need a router. Or employee the chip across the road from me.

    #5941
    welly_nelly
    Participant

    Hi,

    For the money and effect, not really.

    Its just that if water sits /gets in to that joint between the top or bottom iron on edging strip then it can expand the chipboard core.

    Just need to be careful you don’t regularly drip and water onto them.

    Think you need to ensure you get a good seal when you iron it on, without burning the strip ( use some paper between the strip and iron)
    Perhaps there is a way to get a waterproof joint/seal with the edging strip, but not one I know of … others may do ….?

    #5953
    helly_nelly
    Participant

    There may be some stick on type, but have only seen /used the iron on type.

    You need to practice on some offcuts to save messing up the main panels.
    You also need a very sharp blade like a Stanley knife to trim off the excess, though you have to be very careful you do not cut into the finish of the main panel; again a bit of practice.
    You could use sandpaper , but probably more chance of scratching the main face.

    May sound a bit daugnting, but a bit of practice and patience and you can achieve a good finish. 🙂

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.